Little House on the Ferry

GO Logic has developed a construction solution for a seasonal residence that can be applied to remote locations, including the many beautiful and difficult-to-access islands off the coast of Maine.

We have chosen an emerging construction technology, cross-laminated timber or CLT, that utilizes solid, structural, laminated wood components which are factory cut with great precision. By leveraging factory construction of building shell components, which greatly reduces on-site labor, we are developing a sustainable construction solution that can be easily shipped and efficiently assembled on diverse sites.

CLT has received a lot of attention in design and construction circles lately. The panels, comprised of layers of solid lumber that are laminated together in a bidirectional sandwich which is structurally and dimensionally stable, can be fabricated as large as 8’ x 64’ and up to a foot thick. The applications for this material range from small buildings, like this project, to large, multi-story structures.

For Little House on the Ferry, the CLT panels form the enclosure for the entire building—floors, walls, and roofs—and function as both structure and finish, which creates a minimal and somewhat rustic feel. These CLT panels are made from black spruce and locally produced in Quebec. Precut using CNC milling machinery, GO Logic went through several rounds of shop drawings to confirm the size, shape, and orientation of each panel. The sequence of packing, unloading, and erecting the panels was carefully choreographed.

The owners, who wanted a seasonal residence with privacy, intimacy, and simple forms, have a sloping site adjacent to an old granite quarry with expansive ocean views. The residence consists of three small structures—a living unit and two bedroom units that are linked by an exterior deck—that follow the land’s topography and are arranged to create a loosely enclosed outdoor space that can be accessed from multiple points. By separating the residence into independent structures, visitors can enjoy the island with a degree of autonomy. The cedar-clad structures will weather to a natural gray, and a system of sliding screens will provide privacy and light control, in addition to allowing the buildings to be secured over the winter when they’re not in use.

Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us
Trent Bell Little House on the Ferry | GO Logic | www.gologic.us